The Crystal
Joseph H. Reibenspies  Ph.D.
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory
Texas A & M University
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
All rights are reserved.  Please do not copy, modify or distribute thislecture without the consent of the authors.
Crystals
crystal is a solid material,whose constituent atoms,molecules or ions are arrangedin an orderly repeating patternextending in all three spatialdimensions.
http://www.angelway.ca/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/crystals.JPG
http://www.2spi.com/catalog/analytical/images/3d/calcium%20carbonate%20crystals.jpg
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
http://www.corante.com/mooreslore/archives/images/crystal_ball.JPG
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Growing Crystals
Purification:  Use very pure, filtered solutions, clean dirt free solvents, new glassware
Careful re-crystallization
Very slow cooling or
Cooling :  allow solution to cool with hot plate
cool solutions in dewars
use temperature gradients (place glassware against cold window)
Very slow evaporation
use clean purge gases, instead of air, to avoid contaminating solution with dust.
Liquid diffusion and mixed solvents
choose solvents which induce precipitation
Mixed Solvent : Slowly mix the solution with the precipitation solvent at roomtemperature until the solution turns cloudy then re-dissolved by addition of more ofthe original solution. Slowly cool the resulting solution.
PRACTICAL :  Key to good crystals is time! It takes time for molecules to deposit ontocrystal surfaces. Important to have very few nucleation sites
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Liquid Diffusion
Liquid Diffusion : Layerthe precipitatingsolvent and theoriginal solution (5units of solvent to 1unit of solution) in atube. Set the tube in avibration free locationand wait.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Vapor Diffusion
Like liquid diffusion except the precipitating solvent istransferred as a vapor. The solvent must be more volatilethan the solution.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
More Methods
Diffusion of reaction solutions.
Like liquid or vapor diffusion except the solvent containsone reactant and the solution contains the other. Solventdensity can be adjusted to insure a smooth diffusion.
Gel
A U-tube is filled with an inert gel. Reaction mixtures areintroduced on either side of the tube and allowed todiffuse towards each other.
PRACTICAL : Do not isolate all of your crystals leave some in their mother liquorand their original container.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Crystal Quality
By Eye Inspection
If you can see shiny faces and make out size and shapeof your crystals without the aid of a microscope thenthey may be suitable for X-ray analysis.
Microscopic Inspection
what to look for:
well defined faces,
no clumping,
non-opaque,
polarizability i.e. uniform extinction of polarized light
no layered crystals
Size max. ~ 0.5mm for APEX  ~ 0.1mm for GADDS
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Crystal Structure
A crystal structure is composedof a pattern, a set of atomsarranged in a particular way, anda lattice exhibiting long-rangeorder and symmetry
http://bilbo.chm.uri.edu/CHM401/Image1350.gif
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.sketchpad.net/images/sphere03.jpg
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.pollypig.com/Images/Spheres/Yellow_solid_sphere.png
http://www.sketchpad.net/images/sphere03.jpg
http://www.sketchpad.net/images/sphere03.jpg
http://www.sketchpad.net/images/sphere03.jpg
http://www.sketchpad.net/images/sphere03.jpg
http://www.sketchpad.net/images/sphere03.jpg
a
b
c
Angle between b & c is 
Angle between a & c is 
Angle between a & b is 
The unit cell is aparrallepiped thatdescribes the smallestunique volume of thecrystal.
PRACTICAL :: The unit cell can be described by a, b, c 
Inside the Crystal
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
a
b
c
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
Crystal Systems
1. b c      (  90o)                Triclinic*
2. b c  == 90o   90o            Monoclinic
3. b c  =  =   = 90o               Orthorhombic
4.= b c  =  =   = 90             Tetragonal
5.= b c  =  =  90o    = 120o    Hexagonal
6.= b = c       90              Rhombohedral*
7.= b = c  = =  =90              Cubic
*  In the Trigonal notation = b c  =  =  90o    = 120o
P
R
A
C
T
I
C
A
L
 :
:
:
    M
e
m
o
r
i
z
e
 T
h
e
s
e
 S
Y
S
T
E
M
S
 !
!
!
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
Right Handed System
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
*Balashov, V. “The choice of the unit cell in the triclinicsystem”, Acta Cryst. (1956). 9, 319-320.
Practical Example
KNO3   Unit Cell
a = 6.416Å    = 90o
b = 5.403Å    = 90o
c = 9.143Å    =  90o
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
a
b
c
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Lattice Points
Neighborhoodsurrounding eachlattice point is thesame
http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2009/vick_chri/Images/170px-Stick_Figure.svg%5B1%5D.png
http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2009/vick_chri/Images/170px-Stick_Figure.svg%5B1%5D.png
2D Net ofLatticePoints
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Primitive & Centered
Primitive
NOTE :     Primitive Cell has only ONElattice point per cell  (4 points areshared on each corner)
NOTE :   Centered Cellhas two (or more)lattice points per cell
Centered
Mirror Plane
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Cells
Primitive  lattice points = 1 = 8(1/8)
PRATICAL :  Most Common
C-Centered lattice points = 2 = 8(1/8) + 2(1/2)
A,B or C notation (depending on the orientation)
PRACTICAL :  Common
F-Centered  lattice points = 4 = 8(1/8) + 6(1/2)
I-Centered  lattice points = 2 = 8(1/8) + 1
R – (not shown) Trigonal Cells
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Types of Centering
1. Triclinic P1
2. Monoclinic    P,C2
3. Orthorhombic P,C,I,F4
4. Tetragonal  P,I2
5. Hexagonal P1
6. RombohedralR1  : Trigonal
7. Cubic P,I,F3
 Bravais  Lattices Total 14
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Symmetry
Space Symmetry
In space all symmetry operations are present. The only requirement isthat you must fill all space. This requirement puts limits on the axisoperations that are allowed.
Only rotations of 360/n where n = 1,2,3,4 and 6 are allowed.
Notation
                         Rotation Schönfliess Hermann
Identity C1 1
2-fold C2 2
3-fold C3 3
4-fold C4 4
6-fold C6 6
clockwise counter-clockwise
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Symmetry Continued
Mirror
Schönfliess 
Hermannm
Inversion
Schönfliess i
Hermann
Improper rotations
a rotation by 360/n followed by inversion
Hermann= i,    =m,    ,    ,
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
1
1
6
2
3
4
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Translational Symmetry
When molecules are studied point groupsymmetry is applied.
This implies there is only one origin and allsymmetry operations pass through it.
This restriction can be lifted in a latticebecause there are many equivalent points.This is space group symmetry
 Therefore translation can be considered asymmetry operation.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Translation Comments
For a given translation : x + ℓ = x where ℓ issome translational symmetry distance and x isalong an axis of translational symmetry.  Forexample x + 1 is equal to a full unit celltranslation.
Therefore 0.3 and 1.3 are equivalent locationssimply shifted by one translation.  The same istrue for 0.3 and -0.7.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Translational Symmetry (cont.)
Screw Axis
rotation followed by translation
Notation
Nm ( N sub m) N-fold rotation followed by m/N translation
E.g.  2 Two-fold rotation followed by a ½ (unit cell) translation.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Translational Symmetry (cont.)
glide planes
m reflection followed by translation
action
a reflect across ab or ac plane and translate 1/2 along a
b reflect across ba or bc plane and translate 1/2 along b
reflect across ca or cb plane and translate 1/2 along c
n reflect across ab, ac, or bc plane and translate 1/2 along the
   diagonal of that plane. (a+b)/2, (a+c)/2 or (b+c)/2
d reflect across abc plane and translate 1/4 along the diagonal
   of that plane. (a+b+c)/4
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Point Group of the Lattice
Lattice Point groups (LATTICE ONLY!)
point groups which describe the symmetry of lattice
System Point group
Triclinic
Monoclinic 2/m
Orthorhombic mmm
Tetragonal 4/m or 4/mmm
Hexagonal 6/m or 6/mmm
Trigonal/Rhombohedral 3 or 3/m
Cubic m3m or m3
PRACTICAL ::   SADABS (absorption correction) youwill need to know the Lattice Point Group!
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
1
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Space Groups
Space groups
There are only 230 ways (space groups) to describe how identicalobjects can be arranged in orderly arrays in an infinite threedimensional lattice
L ijk    L = lattice
ijk = symmetry elements
i =primary, j = secondary, k = tertiary directions
e.g. 2/m.2/n.21/aor shortenP  mna
P  1.2/c.1    or shorten   21/c
C  1.2/c.1    or shorten   2/c
PRACTICAL ::  International Tables for Crystallography ON LINE
(All 230 space groups) ::  http://it.iucr.org/A/
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Twined Crystals
Twins are regular aggregates consisting of individual crystals of the samespecies joined together in some definite mutual orientation
"Fundamentals of Crystallography“, edited by C. Giacovazzo, Union of Crystallography, Oxford University Press 2nd Edn. 2002.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Types of Twins
Twinning by merohedry
Twin operator: Where the symmetry operator belongs to the crystalsystem but not of the point group of the crystal
racemic twin
Symmetry of the system but not of the Laue group of the crystal
only in tetragonal, trigonal, hexagonal and cubic space groups
Twinning by pseudo-merohedry
Twin operator: belongs to a higher crystal system than the structure
Metric symmetry higher than Laue symmetry
Twinning by reticular merohedry
obverse/reverse twinning in case of a rhombohedral crystal
detection of the lattice centering may be difficult
Non-merohedral twins
Twin operator: arbitrary operator, often rotation of 180°
no exact overlap of the reciprocal lattices
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Rational Directions and Planes
Rational directions in a crystal may be located by extendinga vector from the lattice point that is the origin of the unitcell to any other lattice point.
The direction is labeled with the coordinates of the latticepoint placed in square brackets without commas.
e.g.   The direction parallel to the b-axis of a crystal is [010]. Thisis the same direction as [020], [030], etc. By convention, [010] isused instead of [020], [030], etc.
Rational planes are perpendicular to corresponding rationaldirections
Rational planes are defined by Miller indices, which may bedetermined for any plane from the intersections of the planewith the crystallographic axes.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Miller Indices
Determine the intercepts of the plane ofinterest with the crystallographic axes.
Invert the intercepts (so that x becomes 1/x)
Multiply all terms by the lowest commondenominator to clear fractions
Miller indices are placed in parentheseswithout commas.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
1a
1b
-1a
a
b
1.( a/1,  b/1,  c/)
       (1,1,0)
2.( a/2,  b/1,  c/)
        (2,1,0)
3.( a/-1,  b/1,  c/)
        (-1,1,0)
4.( a/2,  b/ ,  c/)
       (2,0,0)
da/1b/1c/
Rational planes
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
c-axis perpendicular to the plane of the paper
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Reciprocal
(a/1, b/1, c/)      reciprocal    (1,1,0)
    (a/2, b/ 1, c/)    reciprocal    (2,1,0)
    (a/-1, b/ 1, c/)    reciprocal    (-1,1,0)
    (a/2, b/ , c/)     reciprocal     (2,0,0)
      (a3/4,b/1,c/   (3a/4,b/1,c/ (a/4,b/1,c/ (4,1,0)
Indices = (hkl)
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Miller Indices Demo
Miller.gif
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Rational Planes
(hkl) ,   dhkl
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
End of Lecture 1.
Lecture 2.
The Experiment :  Diffraction and Instrumentation
Lecture 3.
The Data :  Data Reduction and Correction.
Lecture 4.
The Preparation :  Laue symmetry and space group selection.
Lecture 5.
The Solution :  Space group ID and structure solution
Lecture 6.
The Refinement :  Model building and Structure Refinement
Lecture 7.
The Mess :  Common problems and some fixes
Lecture 8.
The Model, Validation and Publication.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1