The Diffraction Experiment
Joseph H. Reibenspies  Ph.D.
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory
Texas A & M University
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
All rights are reserved.  Please do not copy, modify or distribute thislecture without the consent of the authors.
Scattering from Objects in Arrays
d
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
FACTS:
The probability that a given photon will result in a scattered photon is <10-20
The scattering for an atom is simply the value for a free electron multiplied by the atomic number
The INTENSITY of the scattered X-ray will fall off as a function of theta.
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Bragg’s Law
d
θ
l
l/d = sinθ
l=dsinθ
(since = l+l then)
 = dsinθ + dsinθ
or
=2dsinθ
3. Since the two waves can be inphase for
  to  n
Then
n=2dsinθ
1. Constructive Interference occurswhen wave 1 and wave 2 are in phase
Wave 1
Wave 2
l
d
θ
θ
l
2. When l+l  then thetwo waves are in phase
Wave 1
Wave 2
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Diffraction and Reciprocal Space
Problem  d and  are on the same side of the equation!
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Unit Cell (real space) andDiffraction (reciprocal Space)
Monoclinic System
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
PRACTICAL:  2D frame of 3D Lattice
T:\PHOTOS\photos3\pahp.jpg
d*1
1.  d*1
d*2
2.  d*2
d*3
3.  d*3
 4.  d*4
       .
       .
 N.  d*n
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
G-Tensor- Matrix
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
What wavelength?
H
10-10m
Angstrom(Å)
Visible Light   4x10-7-9x10-7m
  4000-9000 Å
Boson (photon)
X-rays    0.1 to  14 Å
Fermions
Neutrons
Electrons
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
X-rays and Matter
incoherent scattering
C (Compton-Scattering)
coherent scattering (XRD)
 (Bragg´s-scattering)
Absorption (XANSE etc)
Beer´s law  I = Io*e-µd
Fluorescence (XRF)
o
Photoelectrons (XPS)
wavelength 
intensity Io
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Now Let’s Disco
http://www.styletraxx.com/disco-ball-nye-08.jpg
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
You can reconstruct the structure of the Disco Ball from the images projected on the walls
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Simple X-ray Diffractometer
Collimator
Crystal
Detector
X-ray Tube
e-
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
The X-ray Diffractometer
X-ray Tube
monochromator
collimator
goniometer
Detector
specimen
shutter
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Essential Parts of the X-ray Diffractometer
1.X-ray Tube: the source of X Rays
2.Incident-beam optics: condition the X-ray beam before ithits the sample
3.The goniometer: the platform that holds and moves thesample, optics, detector, and/or tube
4.The sample & sample holder
5.Detector: count the number of X Rays scattered by thesample
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
The Generation of X-rays
Emission Spectrum of a
MolybdenumX-Ray Tube
Bremsstrahlung = continuous spectra
(near misses, bending radiation)
characteristic radiation = line spectra  (direct collisions)
50,000 Volts
0.040 amps
Vacuum
e-
2000 watts
Chilled water
M
K
L
K
K
K
K
e-
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Monochromator/Optics
Type 1.   Filter
               Ni foil will filter Cu
 Y foil will filter Mo
 (high flux)
Type 2.    Crystal
  Graphite (cheap)
  Ge (better, expensive)
  (lower flux)
Type 3.  X-ray Mirrors
  Thin layers (~10A)
                 of Heavy Metals
   (very expensive)
   (high flux)
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
PRACTICAL : X-ray Wavelengths
Use Cu 1.5418Å or Mo 0.71073Å
The longer the wavelength the farther apartthe diffraction spots are in space.
Cu produces more X-rays and the detectorshave a higher efficiency in measuring them.
Mo radiation is not as absorbed as much Cu.Best for heavy element problems
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Three-circle Goniometer
Collimator
X-ray
Tube
X-ray
Detector
(1) 2-Theta Drive
(2) Omega Drive
(3) Phidrive
CrystalSample
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
X-ray Detectors
CCD/Phosphor
Fast, High DQE, Inexpensive
High Background, Hot Spots
Resolution inverse of phosphor thickness
IMAGE PLATE
Wide Area, Adaptable
High Background, Slow
Resolution based on grain size
MWPC/Micro Gap (VANTEC-2000)
No Detector Background, Fast
Limited Area, Expensive
Resolution limited to wire separation
Pixel Area Detector (PAD)
Silicon Strip Technology, very adaptable
Background, very expensive
Resolution based on individual  “chips”
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Three-Circle Single-CrystalDiffractometer
01010003
3circle
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
𝜒=54.7=  sin −1      2    3
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Area Data Collection
T:\PHOTOS\photos3\pahp.jpg
Rotation  image:
Crystal is rotated 360 on the phi axeswith omega and two-theta of 0.0degrees.   Image is stored as a twodimensional digitized “frame”.
Advantage :  Full data collection
Disadvantage :  Overlapping refl.
“thin-sliced” 1 deg or less rotation onthe phi or omega axis.
Advantage :  Less overlap of refls.
Disadvantage :  +hours data collectiontime.
http://cima1.uits.iupui.edu/cima/lustre_iumsc_frames/10121/Images/mo_10121_04_0542.sfrm.jpg
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Typical Experiment
1.Mount crystal and center in X-ray beam
2.Move Detector to a 30deg two-theta.
3.Move phi to 0.0 deg.
4.Move Omega (crystal) 30deg to a fixed position.
5.Open shutter.
6.Move Omega by -0.5 degrees
7.Close shutter.
8.Transfer image to hard disk.
9.Repeat 5-8 until a fixed omega sweep angle is achieved.
10.Move phi by 60 degrees.
11.Repeat 4-9 until a fixed six frame sets is collected.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Lab Space/ Crystal SpaceOrientation Matrix
X
Y
Z
X = a* h + b* k + c* l
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Indexing Reciprocal Space
(100),(010),(001) =>  a* , b* , c*
a* , b* , c*    = >   a,b,c 
Must align X, Y or Z along a* , b*  or c*
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Auto Indexing from the Matrix
(100),(010),(001) =>  a* , b* , c*
a* , b* , c*    = >   a ,b ,c 
Vary u,v and w  and calculate t
If  X.t = integer then t is kept
Repeat for every x with every combination of t
Three longest vectors can be used to find a, b and c
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
FACT:  This can be done because the problem is OVERDETERMINED
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Invert the Matrix to Index in real spaceby BRUTE FORCE
Solve this equation by varying d so that t is close to integer value (within a giventolerance). Brute Force :  repeat over and over again by refining the difference(linear least squares) between  and its nearest integer value.  When finished takethe three best t values to find a, b and c.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
FACT:  This can be done because the problem is OVERDETERMINED
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Orientation Matrix
Laboratory (real)
Space
Crystal (reciprocal )
Space
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Example-CELL_NOW-TWINS
FOM
% within 0.2
a
b
c
alpha
beta
gama
Volume
Lattice
1
1
52.3
17.562
20.629
8.18
90.17
90.08
89.94
2963.5
C
2
0.822
54.3
13.574
8.18
13.604
89.67
99.01
89.95
1491.8
P
3
0.631
53.7
16.243
17.562
20.629
90.06
90.01
90.01
5884.8
I
CELL_NOW - Version 2008-2 - index twins and other problem crystals
    352 reflections read from file: datau.p4p
Cell for domain  1:   17.562   20.629    8.180    90.17    90.08    89.94
   216 reflections within tolerance assigned to domain  1,
   216 of them exclusively;   136 reflections not yet assigned to a domain
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Cell for domain  2:   17.562   20.629    8.180    90.17    90.08    89.94
 
 Rotated from first domain by 177.1 degrees about
 reciprocal axis  0.046  1.000 -0.025  and real axis  0.062  1.000 -0.154
 
   183 reflections within tolerance assigned to domain  2,
   134 of them exclusively;     2 reflections not yet assigned to a domain
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
TotalReflections
>50%Reflections
Remaining
Reflections
2 fold along b
2 is ½V of 1
3 is 2V of 1
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Refining the Unit Cell
1.Non-linear least-squares for D X  = 0
:  standard uncertainties can be determined
      1 part in 1000 for the Volume e.g.  1000(1).
2.Bravais Lattice determination
(search for higher symmetry)
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Cell Reduction
Initial Unit Cell may contain higher symmetry
Niggli-Matrix
  𝑎.𝑎 𝑏.𝑏 𝑐.𝑐 𝑏.𝑐 𝑎.𝑐 𝑎.𝑏  
or
	   𝑎 2   𝑏 2   𝑐 2  𝑏𝑐 cos 𝛼  𝑎𝑐 cos 𝛽  𝑎𝑏 cos 𝛾
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Reduced Cell
Specialized Cells
A reduced form is said to be specialized if there isa simple mathematical relationship between twoor more of the matrix elements
(e.g. a·a b·bb·c 1/2 b·bb·c 1/2 a·c).
No Specialization indicates no additionalsymmetry is present.
Reduced cell ----  Lattice Symmetry(P,A,B,C,F,I,R)
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Example
Cell :   7.504   7.504   21.108    91.82   91.82   112.59
mC  Cell :  8.330  12.484 22.108 90 93.28 90
Niggli Matrix
Transformation
Matix
a.a= b.b   a.c  0
Monoclinic – C    cell
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
Summary
Bragg’s Law : n=2dsinθ
X-rays have the required wavelength for coherentscattering (XRD) from atomic sized objects.
Monochromic X-ray beam is produced by “filtering”the radiation or by crystal diffraction and collimation.
The goniometer is employed to hold and position thesample in the X-ray beam and to position the X-raydetector for data acquisition.
Unit cell is normally determined from a very small butrepresentative data set.
Full data set (of images) is collected in hours (days)
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1
End of Lecture 2.
Lecture 3.
The Data :  Data Reduction and Correction.
Lecture 4.
The Preparation :  Laue symmetry and space group selection.
Lecture 5.
The Solution :  Space group ID and structure solution
Lecture 6.
The Refinement :  Model building and Structure Refinement
Lecture 7.
The Mess :  Common problems and some fixes
Lecture 8.
The Model, Validation and Publication.
http://brandguide.tamu.edu/downloads/primary08.jpg
X-ray Diffraction Laboratory 1.0.1